OSHA Safety Regulations and Labor Law Guide OSHA Safety Regulations & Labor Law Guide

Email us at   
 

Categories
OSHA
Labor Laws

Archives
July 2006

Federal Labor Law
Fact Sheets
General Information
News Articles

OSHA
FAQ
News Articles
OSHA Standards Development
OSHA Act
Draft Proposed Safety and Health Program Rule

Additional Info
Wage Pay and Benefits
FMLA
Workers Compensation
Child Labor
Record Keeping and Notices
Labor Law Center
Links

Resources
Labor Law Poster
OSHA Safety Posters
California State Labor Laws
Florida State Labor Laws
Legal services in Orange County
Labor Law Posters
Legal Law Terms
 


 
Basic Wage Standards
Covered nonexempt workers are entitled to a minimum wage of not less than $4.75 an hour, effective October 1, 1996, and not less than $5.15 an hour, effective September 1, 1997. Overtime pay at a rate of not less than one and one-half times their regular rates of pay is required after 40 hours of work in a workweek.
Wages required by FLSA are due on the regular payday for the pay period covered. Deductions made from wages for such items as cash or merchandise shortages, employer-required uniforms, and tools of the trade, are not legal to the extent that they reduce the wages of employees below the minimum rate required by FLSA or reduce the amount of overtime pay due under FLSA.
The FLSA contains some exemptions from these basic standards. Some apply to specific types of businesses; others apply to specific kinds of work.
While FLSA does set basic minimum wage and overtime pay standards and regulates the employment of minors, there are a number of employment practices which FLSA does not regulate.
For example, FLSA does not require:
? vacation, holiday, severance, or sick pay;
? meal or rest periods, holidays off, or vacations;
? premium pay for weekend or holiday work;
? pay raises or fringe benefits; and
? a discharge notice, reason for discharge, or immediate payment of final wages to terminated employees.
The FLSA does not provide wage payment or collection procedures for an employee's usual or promised wages or commissions in excess of those required by the FLSA. However, some States do have laws under which such claims (sometimes including fringe benefits) may be filed.
Also, FLSA does not limit the number of hours in a day or days in a week an employee may be required or scheduled to work, including overtime hours, if the employee is at least 16 years old.
The above matters are for agreement between the employer and the employees or their authorized representatives.

 
Labor Law Posters
 


Labor Law Talk
Have questions about Labor Law?
Free Online Encyclopedia & Dictionary

Area Code Lookup Labor Law Posters